Rear Admiral Jude Terry inside Naval Command Headquarters at HMS Excellent 17012022 CREDIT MOD Crown Copyright
"I am the first female admiral in the Royal Navy but I will not be the last", Rear Admiral Jude Terry told the Times.
Women

Get this party started: How the Royal Navy's first female admiral kick-starts the day to a dance floor banger

Rear Admiral Jude Terry inside Naval Command Headquarters at HMS Excellent 17012022 CREDIT MOD Crown Copyright
"I am the first female admiral in the Royal Navy but I will not be the last", Rear Admiral Jude Terry told the Times.

Rear Admiral Jude Terry has revealed how her morning wake-up alarm on her phone is a dance floor anthem by popstar Pink as she discussed what it was like to be the Royal Navy's first female admiral.

The Rear Admiral, in an interview with the Times newspaper, also offered some poignant advice after telling how she starts the day with the hit dance track Get the Party Started.

"It's probably not the right music to ease into a day but it certainly shocks the senses," she told the paper.

She said she tended to go for a run along the beach near her flat in Portsmouth or go for a swim, as exercise helped clear her head, before a light breakfast of fruit and yoghurt.

Talking of her childhood, and being born and growing up in Jersey, she said: "As a child, I had no intention of joining the Royal Navy, even though my father was a chief petty officer aircraft engineer.

"Mum wasn't keen when I said I wanted to join up at 16 — she thought I was doing it to honour my father. So I studied science, realised I didn't want to be a doctor, and then signed up. I loved the idea of teamwork."

She told how she was born in Jersey because her father was on deployment in the Indian Ocean at the time so her mother had gone to stay with her parents when she was due.

She said she was taken back to her father's base in Portsmouth as a six-week-old-baby, adding that later in her childhood, one of her earliest memories was dressing up in a child's navy uniform and going to work with her father.

She told how her father had specialised in artillery weapons and spent time on the aircraft carrier HMS Bulwark and how he had spent his career working across the Navy after signing up aged 16.

However, she told how the family suffered a terrible shock when her father died of a heart attack, 18 months after he had retired at the age of 40.

She said her mother was only 38 at the time and, as the family had already moved to Jersey, that become home, together with her younger sister.

She said that while she enjoyed school and worked hard, she did not like doing things by the book which she admitted was "ironic considering the job I do now".

In January, after 25 years of service, Jude Terry took the helm as Director of People and Training and Naval Secretary.

She said that with the numbers, breadth of talent and experience of women in today's Senior Service, there will be many more women to reach the rank – and go higher.

Watch: In May, Rear Admiral Jude Terry spoke about improving environments for servicewomen.

The rear admiral added: "There was also an element of escaping Jersey to see the world, although my family was surprised because I suffered seasickness just travelling on a ferry."

The role makes the admiral responsible for more than 40,000 regular and reservist sailors and Royal Marines.

The rear admiral also told of how proud she was when the Royal Navy played a major role in the Queen's funeral, saying: "I was privileged to lead the operation on behalf of the First Sea Lord, meeting the Princess Royal, as well as addressing the 98 crew who pulled the state gun carriage."

She also highlighted the struggles families have deploying for nine months at sea, adding: "There are many issues I want to take on as an admiral — one is how we can offer everybody, not just women, a more flexible career structure," she said.

Rear Adm Terry said the best advice she was ever given was 'Be yourself and believe in yourself' before she concluded the interview by offering some of her own advice: "Don't ask yourself why, instead ask why not?"