US Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicles (ACV) 19022021 CREDIT US Department of Defence.png
US Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicles (ACV) parked awaiting the end of Marine Air Ground Task Force Warfighting Exercise last year (Picture: US Department of Defense).
USA

'Training incident' leads to pause in US Marines waterborne ACV operations

Reports suggest two Amphibious Combat Vehicles were disabled in a heavy surf at Camp Pendleton Marine Corps base.

US Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicles (ACV) 19022021 CREDIT US Department of Defence.png
US Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicles (ACV) parked awaiting the end of Marine Air Ground Task Force Warfighting Exercise last year (Picture: US Department of Defense).

US Marines have "directed the pause of all waterborne Amphibious Combat Vehicle (ACV) operations" following an ACV "training incident".

Reports have suggested that it was a heavy surf that disabled two ACVs on 19 July at Camp Pendleton, Southern California – one of the largest Marine Corps bases in the US.

A video that has been circulating online, appeared to show one ACV tipped onto its side in the surf zone and another ACV disabled during the training.

No marines or sailors aboard the ACVs were injured in the incident, the US Marine Corps statement confirmed.

It was "out of an abundance of caution" that the pause has been put in place, the US Marine Corps stated.

The pause will allow time for an investigation into the incident, and ensure the assault amphibian community can review best practices and procedures to remain capable, safe, and ready, they said.

"This is the right thing to do," said Lieutenant General David J Furness, the deputy commandant of the Marine Corps for Plans, Policies, and Operations.

"A pause on ACV waterborne operations will give us time to conduct an investigation, learn from this event, and ensure our assault amphibian community remains ready to support our nation."

BAE Systems, which supplies the US Marines with the ACV, describes it as an "adaptable amphibious platform designed from the ground up to fulfil the complex mission objective of deploying Marines from ship to shore".

ACV land operations, including live-fire training, are set to continue being conducted by the Marine Corps during the pause. 

The Marine Corps states that amphibious operations, including the use of amphibious ship-to-shore connectors, are a foundational aspect of operations and critical to the future force and its ability to remain the US's premier expeditionary force in readiness.