Newly-promoted Petty Officers stand in formation aboard the U.S. Navy's forward deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (Picture: US Navy/R.G.Go )
Enlistment age in the US Navy has risen from 39 to 41 (Picture: US Navy/R.G.Go )
USA

Is 41 the new 39? US raises its enlistment age to tackle recruitment struggles

Newly-promoted Petty Officers stand in formation aboard the U.S. Navy's forward deployed aircraft carrier USS George Washington (Picture: US Navy/R.G.Go )
Enlistment age in the US Navy has risen from 39 to 41 (Picture: US Navy/R.G.Go )

The United States Navy has announced it has increased its maximum age of enlistment due to the decline in recruits willing to serve at sea.

Prior to this change in the rules, the US Navy's enlistment cut-off age was 39 and its sailors had to report to boot camp before their 40th birthday.

This change will mean that 41-year-olds would be eligible to report to their respective recruit training establishments prior to their 42nd birthday.

Speaking to Forces News, Navy Recruiting Command spokesman Commander Dave Benham said: "Enlistment age is now 41. Applicants must be able to report to recruit training before their 42nd birthday."

However, he did go on to confirm certain specialists, such as the Navy SEALs and Navy Divers, would still have age cut-offs that differ from the general enlistment age.

This recent policy change will mean the United States Navy is now accepting the oldest enlisted recruits of the American armed services. 

The US Army's maximum enlistment age is 35, while the Space Force and Air Force's age limit is 40.

The Marine Corps' enlisted age limit is the lowest at 28, according to a US Government website detailing requirements for joining the military.