The robotic 'Ghost V60 quadruped is equipped to deploy by parachute, helicopter and air landing (Picture: British Army).
Technology

British Army to form first robotics enhanced brigade complete with futuristic robodogs

The robotic 'Ghost V60 quadruped' is based on the biomechanics of a real dog but with the ability to swap legs or add arms as needed.

The robotic 'Ghost V60 quadruped is equipped to deploy by parachute, helicopter and air landing (Picture: British Army).

16 Air Assault Brigade Combat Team is set to be the first Robotics and Autonomous Systems (RAS) enhanced brigade in the British Army - which comes complete with futuristic, mechanical dogs.

The robotic 'Ghost V60 quadruped' is the latest tool for the British Army's global response and is equipped to deploy by parachute, helicopter and air landing.

The robodog is based on the biomechanics of a real dog but the equivalent of a Swiss army knife - with the ability to swap legs or add arms as needed.

The robot is not autonomous however and remains under the control of an operator at all times thanks to a control pad not dissimilar from a gaming controller.

Colonel James Loudoun, Deputy Commander of 16 Air Assault Brigade Combat Team, said it is "a fantastic opportunity for the team to be at the forefront of the Army experimentation" with RAS.

Col Loudon added Airborne forces were "created as an innovation and we have maintained an innovative and open-minded approach to how we operate".

Watch: Forces News filmed with one of the robodogs last year.

"We are light forces and expect to operate at reach with limited resources and support, so we will embrace any way that we can use technology on the battlefield to support our soldiers and improve overall capability."

The Ghost V60 quadruped is already in trials with US Homeland Security to assist in patrolling the USA's southern border.

Lance Corporal Heath, who trained on the capability, said it would be used as the "eyes and ears".

"If we were approaching a compound or an uncertain area we would be looking for a piece of kit to enable us to push forward, to scope out the area," he said.

"With things like thermal imaging, you are able to attach 'LIDAR' so you’d be able to map out a 3D image. 

"So, commanders would be able to assess the dangers and mitigate those moving forward. The sole purpose of a piece of kit like this is to keep soldiers out of danger."