Tri-Service

WWI Poet Wilfred Owen's Home To Get Listed Status

The home where First World War poet Wilfred Owen lived as a teenager is to be given Grade II listed status. 69 Monkmoor Road in Shrewsbury...

The home where First World War poet Wilfred Owen lived as a teenager is to be given Grade II listed status.
 
69 Monkmoor Road in Shrewsbury was the last family home he lived in prior to his death a week before the end of the conflict.
 
A blue plaque marks the time Owen spent at the house
 
The move comes as part of the ongoing commemorations to mark the 100-year anniversary of the start of the War.
 
Owen spent two days on leave at the house before returning to France, where he was killed in action on 4 November 1918 at the age of 25. He was later awarded the Military Cross.
 
The house was also where his mother Susan learned of his death, on the day of the Armistice on 11 November.
 
The Sambre-Oise canal in France, along which Owen was killed
 
Owen was virtually unknown as a poet during his lifetime, with only four of his poems published by the time of his death, but verses like Dulce Et Decorum Est and Strange Meeting have since come to define the horrors of the Great War.
 
He had joined the Army in 1915 before suffering from shellshock two years later. He was sent to Craiglockhart Hospital in Scotland to recover, where he met fellow war poet Siegfried Sassoon.
 
Heritage minister Ed Vaizey was quoted as saying by the BBC:
 
"Wilfred Owen was one of the most profound and distinct voices of the First World War. His bleak and candid accounts of the horrors of war have shaped our understanding of life on the Western Front.
 
"Owen spent his formative teenage years at Monkmoor Road and wrote many of his early works here.
"As Owen's last home before his untimely death, I am delighted to recognise it for its link to such an iconic and important literary figure," he added.