RAF personnel lay a wreath at RAF Scampton following the death of George 'Johnny' Johnson, who was the last remaining Dambuster from the Second World War
RAF personnel lay a wreath following the death of George 'Johnny' Johnson, who was the last remaining Dambuster from the Second World War.
RAF

RAF pays tribute to last original Dambuster George 'Johnny' Johnson

RAF personnel lay a wreath at RAF Scampton following the death of George 'Johnny' Johnson, who was the last remaining Dambuster from the Second World War
RAF personnel lay a wreath following the death of George 'Johnny' Johnson, who was the last remaining Dambuster from the Second World War.

The Royal Air Force has paid tribute to Squadron Leader George 'Johnny' Johnson, following his funeral.

At the time of his death, aged 101, on 7 December, he was the last surviving member of the original Dambusters.

Wreaths to remember Johnny Johnson and his fellow Dambusters were laid by Air Vice Marshal Simon Edwards, the Assistant Chief of the Air Staff (Strategy), at the RAF Bomber Command Memorial in central London, and by the RAF Scampton Station Commander, Wing Commander Neill Atkins, at 617 Squadron's World War II hangar at RAF Scampton.

Wg Cdr Atkins said the "courageous actions of Johnny, and his comrades… are enshrined in the history of RAF Scampton".

"While we remember Johnny personally, station personnel have today taken time to reflect on the brave actions of the many thousands of aircrew who flew in Bomber Command, so many of whom laid down their lives in World War II."

After training as a Lancaster bomb aimer, Mr Johnson went on to take part in, arguably, the most famous bombing raid of the Second World War.

Watch: Last Dambuster says 1943 raid made a big contribution to the war.

He served as a bomb aimer during Operation Chastise, which was tasked with attacking German dams during the Second World War.

Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, head of the Royal Air Force, said the "courage, skill and resilience" of the original Dambusters "continue to inspire the Royal Air Force to this day".

"We owe an enormous debt of gratitude to Johnny Johnson and all his generation who fought for our freedom in World War II," he added. 

Mr Johnson was recognised long after his war efforts.

In 2017, he collected an MBE from the Queen for services to Second World War remembrance and the community in Bristol.

Watch: Lincoln City FC hold minute's applause for last Dambuster George 'Johnny' Johnson.

He was also a much-loved member of the RAF, becoming a well-known attendee at key Second World War memorial events.

Wing Commander Stewart Campbell, the current Officer Commanding 617 Squadron said current members of the squadron have taken the time to reflect on the "service of Johnny and the rest of the original Dambusters".

"The famous raid that gives us our squadron name was a feat of great daring, but also significant technical innovation," he said.

A lone Spitfire flypast, of the Battle of Britain Memorial Flight, had been planned to recognise Mr Johnson' but was cancelled due to bad weather.

The RAF said the death of Mr Johnson "reminds all serving RAF personnel that Johnny, as a Dambuster, was part of an exceptional group of aircrew who conducted the raid and have gone on to inspire subsequent generations".

"The thoughts and prayers of everyone in the service are with his family and friends at this sad time," the RAF added.