Cadet Ben Hall with his Anderson Shelter. Credit Shelley Hall

Cadets

Cadet Sleeping In Replica WW2 Anderson Shelter

A cadet has built his own Anderson Shelter to sleep in to raise money

Cadet Ben Hall with his Anderson Shelter. Credit Shelley Hall

In our lifetimes most of us will spend an uncomfortable night sleeping on an air mattress or freezing in a tent, but one cadet has taken it to the next level and all for a good cause.

British Army Cadet Ben Hall is sleeping in an Anderson Shelter every night until he returns to school in September to raise money for the Dorset and Somerset Air Ambulance.

Ben, who is a cadet in the Bovington Detachment, built the replica World War Two shelter in his back garden in just three days. He described the shelter as not having much room once he put his camp bed in. He said:

“There’s probably a foot and a half next to the bed to move about in.”

Inside the Anderson Shelter. Credit Ben Hall

Anderson Shelters were used in the Second World War to offer a form of protection from the bombs being dropped during the Blitz.

These shelters were made with corrugated iron on the top, and dug with one half in the ground and one half above ground, usually in back gardens.

LISTEN: Ben speaks to BFBS Radio broadcaster Natasha Reneaux

The cadet started sleeping in the confined space on May 22 and will be sleeping in it until September to raise money for the Dorset and Somerset Air Ambulance. At the time of writing, Ben has raised £2,908.

He has received lots of support from the very beginning with people helping him with the materials to build the shelter, including being sent lights from a Royal Tank Regiment veteran.

Ben spoke to BFBS Radio broadcaster Natasha Reneaux about what it has been like living in the shelter. He said:

“The rain makes it really loud, and you can sometimes hear birds through it.”

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