Army Officer 'Polar Preet' Chandi during solo expedition in Antarctica when she reached South Pole 03012022 CREDIT Preet Chandi.jpg
Polar Preet has had to endure temperatures of -50°C and wind speeds up to 60mph as well as hauling a sledge, weighing around 120kg, loaded with her kit (Picture: Preet Chandi).
Army

Polar Preet 'breaks world record' for longest, solo, unsupported, and unassisted polar expedition by a woman

Army Officer 'Polar Preet' Chandi during solo expedition in Antarctica when she reached South Pole 03012022 CREDIT Preet Chandi.jpg
Polar Preet has had to endure temperatures of -50°C and wind speeds up to 60mph as well as hauling a sledge, weighing around 120kg, loaded with her kit (Picture: Preet Chandi).

British Army officer Captain Preet Chandi has 'broken the world record' for the longest, solo, unsupported and unassisted polar expedition by any woman in history, according to her team.

Polar Preet, as she is known, is said to have passed the previous female record which was 1,368 km skied by Anja Blacha from Germany in 2019.

Despite reportedly breaking the record, she did not complete her aim of becoming the first woman to cross Antarctica solo and unsupported.

This was not her first Antarctic mission, in January last year she became the first woman of colour to reach the South Pole unsupported, which she completed in 40 days, just short of the female world record.

Polar Preet has had to endure temperatures of -50°C and wind speeds up to 60mph as well as hauling a sledge, weighing around 120kg, loaded with her kit.

In her latest update, from Phase – Day 66, she said how tough her final days have been and that she was "pretty gutted" that she did not have the time to complete the crossing.

She said: "Hi Everyone. A tough day today. It was very cold and windy but I kept my breaks very short so I didn't get too cold. I didn't let myself stop earlier though because I wanted to get the miles in.

"I have been given my pickup point which is about 30 nautical miles away from me. I'm pretty gutted that I don't have the time to complete the crossing. I know that I have done a huge journey, it's just difficult while I'm on the ice and I know it’s not that far away."

Capt Chandi also shared the "amazing" voice notes she had been sent from the voices of "those closest" to her.

"Hearing my niece say it's the most amazing thing she has seen anyone do in her entire life and it's even more amazing because it’s her phuwa (auntie) doing it," she said.

"It's so precious to hear. I have not yet located the easter bunny or the tooth fairy, but I still have a couple of days left."

Capt Chandi is a physiotherapist from 3 Medical Regiment working at a Regional Rehabilitation Unit in Buckinghamshire, providing rehabilitation for injured soldiers and officers.

In October, the Princess of Wales became a patron of Polar Preet's Antarctica challenge.

The Prince and Princess of Wales even made sure to wish Capt Chandi good luck before she set off on her expedition.