The crater from a Russian rocket is pictured at the scene of a deadly Russian missile strike on a humanitarian convoy in Zaporizhzhia, southeastern
The civilian convoy had been preparing to visit relatives and deliver supplies in a Russian controlled area (Picture: Ukrinform/Alamy Stock Photo).
Russia

Ukraine: Reports 23 civilians killed following Russian missile strike

The crater from a Russian rocket is pictured at the scene of a deadly Russian missile strike on a humanitarian convoy in Zaporizhzhia, southeastern
The civilian convoy had been preparing to visit relatives and deliver supplies in a Russian controlled area (Picture: Ukrinform/Alamy Stock Photo).

At least 23 people have been killed following a Russian missile strike in Zaporizhzhia, according to a regional governor.

The missile strike hit a convoy of civilian vehicles, according to Oleksandr Starukh, the Zaporizhzhia regional governor, who also said a further 28 people were wounded in the attack on the outskirts of the southern Ukrainian city.

The convoy had been getting ready to leave Ukrainian territory to visit relatives and deliver supplies in an area controlled by Russia, witnesses and Ukrainian officials said.

The missile strike hit a car market, leaving bodies strewn across the ground.

The market was hit by three S300 missiles, according to the head of the explosive disposal unit of the Zaporizhzhia police department.

 

One missile had left a crater in the ground near two lines of vehicles.

Russia denies deliberately targeting civilians.

Watch: The Tulip: What is Russia's mega-mortar being used in Ukraine?

Emergency workers rushed to the scene, with one of the missiles leaving a crater in the ground.

It comes after Moscow said the four regions of Ukraine that held referendums on joining Russia would be incorporated into the country.

This is despite the results being disputed by international observers, including the UK's Foreign Office - who tweeted a picture of the four regions' names in Ukrainian colours.

In an update on Twitter, the UK's Ministry of Defence (MOD) said medical provision for Russian combat troops is "probably growing worse".

"Some newly mobilised Russian reservists have been ordered to source their own combat first aid supplies, with the advice that female sanitary products are a cost-effective solution," the MOD said.

"Some Russia troops have obtained their own modern, Western-style combat tourniquets but have stowed them on their equipment using cable ties, rather than with the Velcro provided – probably because such equipment is scarce and liable to be pilfered."

The MOD said this was "almost certain to hamper or render impossible the timely application of torniquet care in the case of catastrophic bleeding on the battlefield".

"Russian troops' lack of confidence in sufficient medical provision is almost certainly contributing to a declining state of morale and a lack of willingness to undertake offensive operations in many units in Ukraine."

In a clip circling on the internet, Russian recruits have been told to get sanitary products to deal with bullet wounds.