Captain Chandi has been struggling with "dark moments" while crossing the Antarctic (Picture: Preet Chandi).
Captain Chandi has been struggling with "dark moments" while crossing the Antarctic (Picture: Preet Chandi).
Arctic/Antarctic

Polar Preet: 'For now, in the dark moments, I take it one step at a time'

Captain Chandi has been struggling with "dark moments" while crossing the Antarctic (Picture: Preet Chandi).
Captain Chandi has been struggling with "dark moments" while crossing the Antarctic (Picture: Preet Chandi).

British Army officer Captain Preet Chandi has said that she is struggling with "dark moments" while crossing the Antarctic.

Capt Chandi, also known as Polar Preet, has completed day 22 of her 1,100-mile solo trek– a challenge that will see her become the first woman to cross the continent alone with nothing but a 120kg pulk.

A quarter of the way into her journey, the lack of visibility has started to affect Polar Preet's mood. With nothing but a compass to guide her in the right direction, she can't see anything in front of her.

Watch: Polar Preet on how representation and role models are key to inspiring next generation.

The trailblazer expected the darkness would be a challenge she would have to overcome.

Last year, Capt Chandi made history when she became the first woman of colour to reach the South Pole solo and unsupported.

This time she is crossing the whole continent.

According to her blog, staring into darkness has brought her "deepest, darkest thoughts" to the fore.

In an update posted on her website, she said: "It is not always easy. I wanted to go to therapy this year but got so caught up in everything else and felt too busy (which is a poor excuse).

"It is still something I intend to do when I am back, talk to somebody professional to help me when I am in those dark places."

But, she says, for now, she'll continue to take her challenge one step at a time.