Prince Harry

Prince Harry Visits Pioneering Project Treating Conflict Wounds

The centre at Queen Elizabeth Hospital is a world-first, researching combat wounds and developing new ways to treat their effects.

Prince Harry has visited a pioneering project which is developing new ways of treating wounds suffered by servicemen and women.

The Scar Free Foundation centre for conflict wound research is based at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham.  

The Duke of Sussex, himself an Afghanistan veteran, has dedicated much of his time to working for and with people injured serving their country.

The centre is a world-first, researching combat wounds and developing new ways to treat reduce their effects.

The Prince met a range of people during his visit.
The Prince met a range of people during his visit.

In the laboratory the Prince was shown a new battle-ready dressing.

The gel used contains a protein which can significantly reduce scarring on a new wound.

As well as trying to prevent scarring, the project is also working to correct historic scars using laser therapy.

The researchers want to produce the first reliable data about its effectiveness.

As well as trying to prevent scarring, the project is also working to correct historic scars using laser therapy.
As well as trying to prevent scarring, the project is also working to correct historic scars using laser therapy.

The Prince was shown some of the evidence and talked to veteran Karl Hinett, who has received the laser therapy for major scarring from a petrol bomb attack in Iraq.

He said: "We were showing Prince Harry how it works from my own personal experiences.

"It is a form of treatment that is... I had never heard of it until a few years ago, but the results were instant. They were incredible.

"I think he [Prince Harry] was just as surprised as anyone else really, because no one has really heard of it.

"For Prince Harry to come and support this work is incredible, because this study, this treatment is for future generations."

As well as working to reduce the physical scarring, the Scar Free Trust is working on reducing the mental impact an altered appearance can have.

Prince Harry then went to a meeting of veterans and their families, who are central to the work by putting themselves forward as research guinea pigs.

The centre is a world-first - researching combat wounds and developing new ways to treat reduce their effects.

Diana Harcourt is the Director of the Centre for Appearance Research, and said:

"Until now, the research that has been carried out has been with the civilian population.

"There has not been a programme of research like this that has looked at the issues around scarring, or limb loss or gunshot wounds that have altered appearance as a result of military conflict.

"That is what makes this really exciting, is that we are able to learn from those who have been in this situation, use that information to develop supportive interventions which will then go on to help those who are in this situation in the future."

As well as working to reduce the physical scarring the scar free trust it working on reducing the mental impact an altered appearance can have.
As well as working to reduce the physical scarring the scar free trust it working on reducing the mental impact an altered appearance can have.