World War One silhouette Scottish Parliament
Scotland

WWI Soldier Silhouette Unveiled At Scottish Parliament

The life-size aluminium installation depicting a "Tommy" will be on display at Holyrood until 12 November.

World War One silhouette Scottish Parliament

A silhouette statue of a First World War soldier has been unveiled at the Scottish Parliament.

The life-size aluminium installation depicting a "Tommy" will be on display at Holyrood until 12 November, as part of commemorations marking 100 years since the Armistice.

It is part of nationwide programme 'There But Not There', which involves outlines of soldiers being placed in locations across the UK.

Alexander Stewart MSP, honorary ambassador for the Ancre Somme Association, said: "I think it's vitally important that we remember and we commemorate the situation that we have this year.

"This statue is very haunting, it gives an impression to anyone who sees it instantly and I think it's vitally important that we have it here at the Scottish Parliament."

Tommy Davidson, secretary of the Ancre Somme Association, added: "Sadly, 100 years ago many of the soldiers who came home wouldn't want to speak about what they actually witnessed or experienced.

"The death, the destruction, the blood, the guts, walking through bodies that were lying the battlefields.

"Great-grandfathers wouldn't have come home and spoken about that, for those that did come home."

There But Not There Westminster Abbey Art Installation First World War WW1
The six-foot tall silhouettes are part of a drive to raise money for armed forces and mental health charities (Picture: There But Not There).

Designed by artist Martin Barraud, the piece has been gifted to the Scottish Parliament's Art Collection by the association.

It has been described as depicting "every man" who fought and died in the war.

Deputy presiding officer Christine Grahame said: "It is particularly poignant as we commemorate and remember 100 years since the end of the Great War.

"So many young men had their lives ahead of them but were never to return to their families. This sculpture is a fitting tribute to them.

"It is important that we find ways to remember and reflect on the scale of the loss that was experienced by so many communities and families across Scotland."

"Many lives are lost unnecessarily. Politicians, in particular, should always remember that."