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WATCH: Cavalrymen Gather In London To Honour Fallen Troops

More than 2,000 Cavalrymen have taken part in the 94th Annual Parade and Service of The Combined Cavalry Old Comrades Association.

Cover picture: British Army/Twitter

More than 2,000 Cavalrymen have taken part in the 94th Annual Parade and Service of The Combined Cavalry Old Comrades Association at the Cavalry Memorial.

The parade pays tribute all those who have given their lives to conflict since the First World War.

HRH the Princess Royal, Colonel of The Blues and Royals, took the salute at the march which included serving and veteran soldiers from the Household Cavalry, Royal Dragoons and Royal Yeomanry from units all over the UK.

Princess Anne also laid the Combined Cavalry wreath at the Cavalry Memorial and attended an open air church service.

The Combined Cavalry Old Comrades Association at the Cavalry Memorial 2018
Picture: British Army/Twitter

Chelsea Pensioner Arthur Currie, who's the wreath-layer for The Queen's Royal Hussars, said every year "it's a great pride":

"It’s quite moving, particularly when my regiment walks past, they will burst into song, the only regiment that do it.

"We sing our regimental march and everybody goes 'Why are they doing that?'. We’ve always done it, that's what The Queen's Royal Hussars do, it's a bit of panache."

The parade is famous for its traditional dress of Bowler hats, suit and tie, which was the accepted outfit in 1920s London when the annual event started.

The Combined Cavalry Old Comrades Association at the Cavalry Memorial 2018
Umbrellas are carried not in case of rain but take the place of a sword or pace stick. (Picture: British Army/Twitter)

When Her Majesty The Queen Mother took the salute on a parade in torrential rain, she insisted umbrellas remained firmly furled as a reminder to all that these were soldiers marching.

The Cavalry memorial in Hyde Park was unveiled at Stanhope Gate, Hyde Park on 21 May 1924, and then moved to its present location in 1961.

The statue itself is cast from metal obtained from enemy guns captured by the Cavalry in the First World War.

It depicts St George, the patron saint of the Cavalry, who - having administered the coup de grace to the dragon with his sword - reins in his charger and raises his sword high in token of victory.