D-Day veterans
Veterans

One Million Veterans To Be Affected By TV Licence Change, Minister Says

Tobias Ellwood MP called on the BBC to "rethink" the announcement that free TV licences for over 75s will be discontinued.

D-Day veterans

Veterans were involved in commemorations for D-Day 75 last week (Picture: MOD).

More than one million veterans will be affected by the BBC's decision to discontinue its free TV licences for over 75s, a defence minister has said.

The corporation has come under fire after announcing that, from June 2020, the concession will be available only to households where someone receives Pension Credit.

It is believed 3.7 million pensioners will lose out as a result.

Tobias Ellwood MP told the BBC he does not think it is "the way we should be treating our veterans". 

Mr Ellwood mentioned how D-Day 75 commemorations just last week "paid tribute to the incredible capability" of veterans who will now be charged under the changes.

In a tweet, the former Royal Green Jackets officer said "#letsrethinkthis".

The BBC was set to start providing free licences for over-75s from the Government in 2020.

Commemoration events were held in Normandy and the UK to mark 75 years since D-Day last week (Picture: MOD).
Commemoration events were held in Normandy and the UK to mark 75 years since D-Day last week (Picture: MOD).

Only around 1.5 million households will be eligible for a free TV licence under the new scheme.

The free licence fee was first paid for by a Labour government in 2000.

But under the Conservatives in 2015, ministers announced an agreement had been reached between Government and the BBC, and the broadcaster would shoulder the cost.

The Government has been criticised for forcing the financial burden on to the BBC.