News

'Ultimate Endurance Race': Runners Take On Paras Selection Route

The PARAS’ 10 is an authentic military challenge run over the same 10-mile course used in Paratrooper selection.

More than 800 civilian and military runners have taken part in one of the UK's toughest endurance races.

The PARAS’ 10 is an authentic military challenge run over the same 10-mile course used in Paratrooper selection.

View of Paras 10-mile route at Catterick Garrison in North Yorkshire
PARAS' 10 takes place at Catterick Garrison in North Yorkshire.

Competitors can choose to run ‘clean fatigue’, in shorts and trainers, or ‘tabbed’, the Para way, wearing boots and carrying a 35lb Bergen military rucksack.

Prospective Paratroopers taking part in the selection trek also carry a weapon and must complete the march in 1 hour 50 minutes.

Military and civilian runners tackle the Paras 10-mile race Catterick Garrison in North Yorkshire.
The event is based on The Parachute Regiment's 10-mile trek at the end of selection training.

Among the competitors was Paralympian Scott Meenagh. The ex-Paratrooper lost both legs after he stepped on an IED (Improvised Explosive Device) in Afghanistan in 2011.

After a year of rehabilitation and learning to walk again with prosthetic limbs, he turned to sports. 

He captained the British Army team to multiple medals at the Invictus Games in 2014, where he won two silvers on the water and added two more silvers on the athletics track in Toronto 2017.

Scott said nothing compares to running on blades:

"It's such an aggressive movement. It's so physically demanding on the body. They say that it takes 200% energy for a double-amputee to walk, never mind run."

Hannah King seeks advice from PARAS' 10 regular 81-year-old RAF veteran Mike Doyle
Forces News Reporter Hannah King seeks advice from PARAS' 10 regular Mike Doyle.

Eighty-one-year-old Mike Doyle served in the RAF Regiment and has become a regular fixture at the annual event. He competed with a full 35lb pack and said his secret to success is to focus his mind as the body is capable of doing extraordinary things.

"Don't look too far ahead, just look about 10 or 20 feet in front. Otherwise you could get disheartened, because it's pretty rough terrain."

Stephen Cooper, director of a charity benefitting from the event, said: "We call it the ultimate endurance race, it is tough.

"This is what the Paras do to become Paras."

Competitors climb hill at PARAS' 10 endurance challenges
PARAS' 10 is described as the ultimate 10-mile endurance race.

The organisers say the main aim of PARAS' 10 is to raises funds for the charity 'SUPPORT OUR PARAS' whilst providing a challenging and enjoyable event.