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The Final Challenge For A US Marine Recruit

US marine recruitment is notoriously tough.And as the latest female trainees near the end of the selection process, Forces News was given...

US marine recruitment is notoriously tough.

And as the latest female trainees near the end of the selection process, Forces News was given special access to Parris Island, and the final hurdle faced by these young women.

It's quite a challenge, consisting of a 54-hour training exercise that culminates in a nine-mile hike.

But once they're done, the recruits are handed what it is they've all been working for: the much-coveted Eagle Globe and Anchor badge, the symbol of the United States Marines.

To get the badge, the recruits have to make it through seven tough events that are designed to test everything they’ve learnt during their boot camp. They make up what's called the 'crucible'.

One main focal point of the assessments is how well they can pull together as a team.

That means both thinking for themselves as individuals, as well as communally, so that they can take particular roles within a strong team.

At the end of these physically and mentally draining activities, during which they get very little sleep and food, they have a nine-mile hike to complete... with full kit, and starting at 4 o'clock in the morning. 

But once they make it to this last step, they know the Eagle Globe and Anchor badge are nearly within their grasp - if they can just make it through. 

Having done so, every gruelling day of their 13-week training will have been worth it.

More: 'You Have To Pass The Crucible To Become A US Marine'