Tri-Service

Army Head Defends Women In Combat

The demands being placed on the British military means there is no room for allowing sexism to get in the way of talent. That's the...

The demands being placed on the British military means there is no room for allowing sexism to get in the way of talent.
 
That's the rationale behind the Ministry of Defence's move to allow women into all roles within the military, including combat roles. 
 
The MoD made the decision following a health report evaluating the risks to women of serving in combat roles.
 
The professional head of the Army, General Sir Nicholas Carter, says standards will not slip and women will be properly supported when they take on combat roles for the first time.
"The big change is opening all roles up, which sends a very powerful message. It gives us a great opportunity to maximise the talent from all of the population of the United Kingdom."
More than 80% of jobs across the Armed Forces are open to women already, and in response to criticisms that the MoD is being motivated by political correctness, General Carter has said:
"If you're an infantryman now, you're just as likely to have your minefield cleared and to be escorted through that minefield by a woman... and you're just as likely to have your radio operated by a woman... I don't see that this is anything more than a natural evolution".
In November, the Royal Armoured Corps will be the first British regiment to open up combat roles to women.
 
The Royal Armoured Corps (RAC) forms the core of the British Army’s Mounted Close Combat (MCC) capability, along with the regiments of the Household Cavalry. 
 
The 14 regiments which make up the corps are descended from the famous cavalry regiments who rode into battle on horseback, as well as the Royal Tank Regiment, formed in World War One.