WW1 Letters from the trenches
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Tragic Lost Letters: Messages From WWI's Frontline Discovered

Poignant letters written by an exhausted First World War soldier who wanted to be home for 'Sunday dinner' and ‘custard’ have been...

WW1 Letters from the trenches

Poignant letters written by an exhausted First World War soldier who wanted to be home for 'Sunday dinner' and ‘custard’ have been discovered.

The notes were sent by a war-weary Albert McMillan who wrote about the hellish conditions of the trenches in 1916.

Within weeks of penning one letter to his late sister Lucy, the soldier, who was stationed in France with No 2 Platoon, 1st Battalion, was reportedly killed.

The letters were discovered and read for the first time only after Lucy's recent death. Her son, Alan Blake, 88, from Meanwood, West Yorkshire made the discovery in his late mother's house.

One of the letters, dated 17/4/16, begins: "I am writing this from the trenches, it is Sunday afternoon, I could just do with being home for my tea.

"I could just eat some custard... I see you keep having the Zeppelins over... Will you get me a writing pad as the one Florie sent me is done.

"I want one with a strong back as we have to throw our things about."

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Another addressed to Lucy reads: "To Lucy, Stanley and Norman, I thank you very much for your little present and letter.

"You don't know how pleased I was when I opened it and saw who it was from.

"Well, I am glad to hear you are all well.

"I am back in the trenches again now and we are only 25 yards away from the Germans.

"They are keeping very quiet just now but when they start on us, we always give them twice as much back and something to be quiet for.

"I will now have to close my letters as I am going on sentry [duty]."

Alan said: "When I found the letters, it made me very sad to think all he wanted to do was to have some custard and there he was fighting for his country.

"I just thought it was important this year and to point out people should be grateful for what they have."

Letters penned by an exhausted First World War soldier who just wanted to be home for Sunday dinner have been discovered
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