Outgoing UKMCC Cdre Ed Ahlgren left with his successor Cdre Adrian Fryer (Picture: MOD).
Outgoing Commodore Ed Ahlgren (left) hands over to Commodore Adrian Fryer (Picture: MOD).
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New face at the helm of Royal Navy's Middle East mission

Outgoing UKMCC Cdre Ed Ahlgren left with his successor Cdre Adrian Fryer (Picture: MOD).
Outgoing Commodore Ed Ahlgren (left) hands over to Commodore Adrian Fryer (Picture: MOD).

A new boss has taken command of Royal Navy operations in Bahrain, in the shape of Commodore Adrian Fryer.

The incoming commander is no stranger to Bahrain, having previously served in the Middle East as Commander of Coalition Task Force Sentinel, the operational arm of the International Maritime Security Construct, which protects shipping in some of the region's most dangerous and threatened waters.

Cdre Fryer takes over from Commodore Ed Ahlgren, who has directed Operation Kipion – the UK's commitment to promoting peace and stability in the Middle East – for the past 12 months as the UK Maritime Component Commander.

Cdre Fryer said: "I look forward to a successful year working with our partners and allies to maintain maritime security in the region.

"Having served in Bahrain before, it is an honour to return as the UK's Maritime Component Commander."

The role was created after the 9/11 terrorist attacks in New York and Washington in 2001 and oversees a headquarters staff directing the Royal Navy's efforts from the Suez Canal to the western seaboard of India.

He will be responsible for more than 500 sailors and Royal Marines on a daily basis, from the crew of frigate HMS Montrose to the four Royal Navy minehunters based in Bahrain, plus their mother ship RFA Lyme Bay.

Cdre Fryer's predecessor Cdre Ahlgren was applauded out of the naval facility by Armed Forces personnel, who lined up the main road to the base.

"It's been my immense privilege to lead the UK's Maritime Component Command for the last year," he said.

Personnel applaud Cdre Ahlgren off the base (1).jpg 18012022 CREDITS MOD
Personnel applaud Commodore Ahlgren off the base (Picture: MOD).

The minehunters have been in the Middle East for 15 years, working alongside partner nations to keep vital shipping lanes open in the region's most dangerous and threatened waters.

HMS Montrose, which has now spent more than 1,000 days in the region, has scored successful drugs busts and safely escorted merchant ships through key maritime chokepoints.