Remembrance

Red Poppy To Remember Military and Civilian Terror Victims

The red poppy should be worn to remember civilian victims of war and terrorism, as well as the Armed Forces, the Royal British Legion says.

The Remembrance poppy went on sale for the first time in 1921 (Picture: MOD).

The red poppy should be worn to remember civilian victims of war and terrorism, as well as the Armed Forces, the Royal British Legion (RBL) has said

The charity updated its website to clarify that the poppy is a symbol which acknowledges both the Armed Forces community and the “innocent civilians who have lost their lives in conflict and acts of terrorism” but it says this does not represent a change in policy for the charity.

It says the Poppy “represents all those who lost their lives on active service in all conflicts; from the beginning of the First World War right up to the present day.

It also honours the contribution of civilian services and the uniformed services which contribute to national peace and security and acknowledges innocent civilians who have lost their lives in conflict and acts of terrorism.”

The RBL's assistant director of remembrance, Robert Lee, said the organisation's position "hasn't changed" and it "has always acknowledged the human cost of conflict and looked towards a peaceful future".

"It's important communities know their views and values are reflected in our activity", he said.

"As a charity, we have a particular responsibility to the Armed Forces community under our charitable remit...but Remembrance has a wider meaning and role, and this does include all civilians affected by conflict and terrorism."

Forty million poppies are distributed each year - in 2018, the Royal British Legion raised more than £50 million for veterans of the UK Armed Forces and their families.