Trump

Picture: Gage Skidmore.

US President Donald Trump will be treated to a Guard of Honour when he meets the Queen at Windsor Castle.

Buckingham Palace announced that the monarch will meet the American leader and First Lady Melania Trump at the dais in the Quadrangle of the historic Berkshire royal residence on Friday.

A Guard of Honour, formed of the Coldstream Guards, will give a Royal Salute and the US national anthem will be played.

The Queen and Mr Trump will inspect the Guard of Honour before watching the military march past.

Mr and Mrs Trump will also join the Queen for tea at the Castle.

The Queen has received three other US Presidents at Windsor Castle since the 1980s - Barack Obama in 2016, George W Bush in 2008 and Ronald Reagan in 1982.

Trump and May
Mr Trump and the Prime Minister will also visit an unnamed defence site to view a display of Britain's defence capabilities (Picture: PA).

A Downing Street spokeswoman said: "In every aspect of our relationship, we are seeking to deepen our special relationship and defence is one of those, and security.

"Our armed forces have fought together for over a century and no two countries work closer together in defence co-operation and that element of the visit is a reflection of that."

The President and his wife will also spend Friday night at the US Ambassador's London residence Winfield House, in Regent's Park.

Other parts of the visit will include a black-tie dinner at Blenheim Palace, which will begin with a military ceremony in the Great Court of the Palace, where the bands of the Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards will play the Liberty Fanfare, Amazing Grace, and the National Emblem.

On his departure from the Palace, Mr Trump will be "piped out" by the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

The President will also spend a weekend in Scotland.

"We're looking forward to making sure the president has a chance to see and experience the UK beyond London and the South-East," said the Number 10 spokeswoman.

However, protests are expecting to take place in London.

"As with any protest, we are a free and open democracy and we believe in the right to peaceful protest," she added.

"But I would also say that I think the majority of British people understand the importance of the UK-US alliance.

"The presidential visit is an important moment to recognise our close and special relationship and to have good and frank discussions on the key issues."

Mr Trump arrives in the UK on board Air Force One next Thursday afternoon, straight from the NATO summit in Brussels where he is expected to confront European allies over levels of defence spending.

On Sunday, Mr Trump is expected to move on to Finland ahead of his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki on 16 July.