Arctic/Antarctic

Penguin parade welcomes Royal Navy icebreaker back to the Antarctic

HMS Protector is on a mission to support international research into wildlife, the changing climate and the shifting waters of Antarctica.

Royal Navy icebreaker HMS Protector is back in Antarctica, this time working with the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust at Port Lockroy.

HMS Protector will assist Port Lockroy team members as they carry out essential assessments and repairs to their sites in Antarctica – all while trying to not disturb the nesting Gentoo penguins.

The Royal Navy's only Antarctic research ship recently completed her first Antarctic mission of the season – revealing the impact of global warming.

HMS Protector is on a five-year mission to support international research into wildlife, the changing climate and the shifting waters of Antarctica.

The Plymouth-based icebreaker has three 'work periods' planned around the Antarctic Peninsula before autumn descends on the region and rules her out from moving safely around numerous bases and through icy waters.

In their latest blog post, the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust and Port Lockroy team members spoke about their relief at leaving hotel quarantine and being transferred to HMS Protector.

Base leader Lucy Dorman said: "All of the crew have been incredibly friendly and helpful and each of the team have found their 'people'.

"I have discussed the approach to Port Lockroy with the navigator, and how we might land our stores with the coxswain."