Anonymous British Army personnel CREDIT BFBS.jpeg
Major General Paul Griffiths, the director of Army personnel confirmed there will be no impact on operations.
Army

Op Teamwork: Army to tackle cultural and inclusivity issues among the service

The day will involve those who are not on essential taskings taking part in courses to improve cultural and inclusivity awareness.

Anonymous British Army personnel CREDIT BFBS.jpeg
Major General Paul Griffiths, the director of Army personnel confirmed there will be no impact on operations.

A training day for the Army on "culture and inclusion" will see a complete stop of non-essential tasks for a "real focus" on developing the ideas and changes for the service.

The training day, nicknamed Operation Teamwork, is due to take place on 8 February and will address any matters that fall short of the Army's values and standards, including, but not limited to, drug and alcohol abuse, sexual harassment, bullying, and racism.

Chief of the General Staff General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith made it clear that a change in behaviour and culture within the service was needed when he asked generals "to think about their personal actions" in December.

How 'Operation Teamwork' will work

Operation Teamwork is understood to be the first part of a new movement by the Army and its commanders to erase outdated thinking and behaviour.

Army personnel who are not on operational duties or other essential work have been directed to watch a number of internally produced videos and hold discussion groups that will allow reflection on the Army's current culture – with an approach to inclusion and how it should go about improving both.

Team-building exercises have not been directed, but commanders have been given the freedom to carry out any additional exercises they feel appropriate for the day.

The videos due to be used on the day are not for external release as they include some personal and sensitive accounts that were only intended for an internal audience to ensure the day had an impact and resonated accordingly.

Chief of the General Staff General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith
Chief of the General Staff General Sir Mark Carleton-Smith said he wants to "change" the Army and "improve the experience for every single man and woman who serves in it" (Picture: MOD).

Major General Paul Griffiths, Director Personnel, confirmed there would be no impact on operations.

He said: "The British Army's culture is built upon strong values, high standards and a sense of belonging to an effective fighting force.

"Just like any other professional organisation, we are continually striving to build stronger and more effective teams. 

"The Army will stop non-essential tasks and really focus on developing the ideas and changes we all want to see in our service, in order to help make it the best possible place to build a career."

In a statement, the Army said it recognises the potential of teams, and the importance of instilling teamwork in its day-to-day life and will aim to actively strive to remove barriers, maximise diversity and enhance operational capability through true inclusion.

The statement reiterates that "this is just the beginning" of the efforts.