Scotland

New State-Of-The-Art Ship Welcomed Into Service In Scotland

The 39,000-tonne RFA Tidesurge has been added to the Royal Auxiliary fleet.

The Royal Fleet Auxiliary has welcomed the newest ship of its high-tech tide-class tankers into the service.

RFA Tidesurge will provide vital support to the Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers as well as taking part in counter-piracy and disaster relief missions.

The latest ship in the Royal Fleet Auxiliary’s arsenal - RFA Tidesurge has completed her final sea trial and now joins the ranks of the Royal Navy’s civilian manned support force.

The 39,000-tonne fleet replenishment tanker will provide fuel and water for Navy ships across the world.

Tide-class vessels are the biggest in the service and can accommodate all UK Maritime helicopters as well as CH-47 Chinook.

The Tide class tankers are state of the art double-hulled vessels - making them safer (Picture: Royal Navy).

This is the third tide-class vessel to enter the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.

A service of dedication to mark the occasion was held in the Scottish port of Greenock.

The town was previously associated with RFA Gold Rover - and the service is keen to continue this proud association.

Head of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary, Commodore Duncan Lamb, commented on the new addition to the fleet.

"They've been designed specifically to support a carrier task group, at full operational capability.

"So the whole fuel system design, the fuel delivery design, is unique to these ships.

"We've got six tankers in total, so four of them will form quite an element of that tanker support force."

A service of dedication to mark the occasion was held in the Scottish port of Greenock.

The tide-class tankers are state of the art double-hulled vessels - making them safer.

As well as replenishing ships at sea - they’ll also take part in a wide range of operations.

From policing shipping lanes to supplying humanitarian aid - and supporting NATO allies.

The vessels have been extensively customised with a fully automated safety system in place.

Captain Miles Lewis, Commanding Officer RFA Tidesurge said:

"It's an absolutely wonderful day. Today she moves from being a trial ship into the fleet and the service, and is dedicated into the service.

"So really good to show off the ship, and show off the Royal Fleet Auxiliary as well."

This is the third Tide class vessel to enter the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.

Chief Petty Officer Craig Smithies noted: "They've gone down the lines of computers and computer generation screens.

"It's a lot easier to get an overall picture initially.

"Once you've got a picture, then you can deal with it. It does have its benefits."

The vessels have been extensively customised with a fully automated safety system in place.

Now she has been accepted into the service - RFA Tidesurge will leave the west of Scotland and head for the south coast.

There she will take part in Flag Officer sea training to make sure the vessel and her crew are prepared for the vital role in front of them.