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Hyde Park bomb survivor: 'I could literally feel my eardrum disappearing'

A new film produced by a group of British Army veterans is set to tell the story of the Hyde Park bombing.

Just after 10.30am on 20 July 1982, IRA terrorists exploded a device in Hyde Park at the precise moment 15 soldiers and horses from the Blues and Royals were passing by on their way to mount guard.

Four men and seven horses were killed, and many more were injured. 

Forces News spoke to Simon Utley, a survivor of the attack that sent shockwaves around the world.

He recalls the moment the nail bomb detonated: "I actually thought at the time that someone had hit me on the back of the head.

"I thought my corporal horse at the time had caught me talking.

"There was a mass vacuum of air just disappearing around you, and then the sharpest explosion in your ear. I could literally feel my eardrum disappearing," he added.

Forty years on, filmmaker Mauricio Gris, himself a former captain in the Household Cavalry, has produced a documentary about the bombing and its victims.

"When I found out that no-one had told this story before in any depth, I absolutely thought it had to be captured," he said.

"We had the skill and the capability to be able to do that, so set about doing it."

Filmmaker Mauricio Gris (left) with Hyde Park bomb survivor Simon Utley (right) revisit the spot where, four decades ago, the IRA detonated an explosive device 12072022 CREDIT BFBS
Filmmaker Mauricio Gris (left) with Hyde Park bomb survivor Simon Utley (right) visit the memorial in Hyde Park.

Survivor Simon says he was "immensely proud" to be asked to be part of the film.

For him, it was crucial to "tell the story of the guys that were involved on the day".

"Not the politics and the other stuff that has gone on, but us, as humans, and how it's affected us over the last 40 years if it's affected us."

Filmmaker Mauricio is keen for people interested in the story to get involved, as the film is dependent on the generosity of supporters.

Mauricio and his team of professional filmmakers, made up of fellow Army veterans launched a crowdfunding page, calling for people to support their work with donations.

The film is set to be premiered at the National Army Museum in Chelsea on 19 July, on the eve of the 40th anniversary of the attack.

Cover image: Filmmaker Mauricio Gris (right) with Hyde Park bomb survivor Simon Utley (left) as they revisit the spot where, four decades ago, the IRA detonated an explosive device.