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Is The Home Of Britain's Nuclear Fleet Sinking?

A study has reported that due to rising sea levels Faslane naval base, which is home to the UK's Trident submarines, could be at risk.

A study has reported that due to rising sea levels Faslane naval base, which is home to the UK's Trident submarines, could be at risk.

The Scottish Natural Heritage has identified hundreds of areas that could be at risk in the future as the sea level could rise by more than half a meter over the next seven decades.

According to their report, the sea levels in the Firth of the Clyde could be 47cm higher in 2080 than in 2008.

It's not just the Naval Base that is at risk, other local infrastructure such as: A roads, railway lines, the rail station at Prestwick International Airport, Mudflats and areas of saltmarsh which are used by birds for nesting and feeding in a protected area of the inner Clyde.

Mike Cantlay, Chairman of Scottish Natural Heritage, said:

"We conduct regular research into the long-term future of Scotland's natural environment... having this advance notice allows partners to work together to address potential issues and plan ahead for ways to mitigate these risks."

Coastal communities living in areas such as Greenock, Gourock, Campbeltown, Lochgilphead, Dunoon, Faslane, Inverkip, Largs, Stevenston, Irvine, Troon, Prestwick, Ayr, Girvan, Rothesay and Kelburn could also all be affected by the rising waters.

Professor Des Thompson, of SNH, said there are opportunities to allow nature to help us cope with climate change:

"One such solution is through managed realignment of the coast. This allows natural features such as saltmarsh to act as coastal defence.

"We know that rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns and intensities are likely to increasingly affect nature and society".

Scottish Natural Heritage is working with their partner to plan ahead for ways to mitigate these risks.

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