A view from the Quarter Deck of HMS Victory looking forward during the Trafalgar Day ceremony (Picture: MOD).
History

Trafalgar Day: Navy marks 216th anniversary of Nelson's victory

Naval officers celebrated on board HMS Victory at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

A view from the Quarter Deck of HMS Victory looking forward during the Trafalgar Day ceremony (Picture: MOD).

Naval officers gathered to mark the anniversary of Vice Admiral Lord Nelson's famous victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.

The Second Sea Lord, Vice Admiral Nick Hine, led the celebrations aboard HMS Victory at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard which involved a wreath being laid on the spot where Lord Nelson died 216 years ago.

The ceremony, which was reduced in size last year to meet COVID-19 regulations at the time, began with the daily naval ceremony of Colours in which the white ensign and the union flag are hauled up.

This was followed by the flag sequence indicating Nelson's famous message to the fleet: "England expects that every man will do his duty."

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "Trafalgar Day is the most important day in the calendar of HMS Victory, the oldest commissioned warship in the world.

"About 70 officers, ratings, cadets and guests, including the Lord Mayor of Portsmouth and representatives of the United States, Polish, Turkish and New Zealand militaries, watched as Vice Admiral Hine laid a wreath on the spot Lord Nelson fell during the battle."

Lord Nelson was shot dead by a French sniper as the Royal Navy claimed victory over the French and Spanish navies at Trafalgar, off Cadiz, Spain, on 21 October 1805.