Capt David Hughes, lays a wreath at a graveside
WWI

Soldiers Killed During WWI Commemorated With Services

Services have taken place on the Western Front to commemorate two soldiers killed during the First World War.

Capt David Hughes, lays a wreath at a graveside

Capt David Hughes, 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh, lays a wreath at the graveside of the unknown South Wales Borderer (Picture: Crown Copyright).

Services have taken place on the Western Front to commemorate two soldiers killed during the First World War.

A rededication service for Captain William Miles Kingston DSO, The Royal Welsh Fusiliers, took place at Tyne Cot Cemetery.

This was just after a burial service for an unknown soldier, of The South Wales Borderers, had taken place at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s Béthune Town Cemetery, France.

Capt Kingston was killed, having been hit by a shell, at 38 years old.

His body was recovered but he was buried in Tyne Cot as an unknown soldier.

Due to him being unidentified, he was commemorated on Menin Gate.

Since then researchers have submitted evidence they believe to show they had found his final resting place.

The MOD’s Joint Casualty and Compassionate Centre and the National Army Museum were able to corroborate the evidence, which enabled them to identify Capt Kingston.

The Kington family said: "We are extremely grateful for the hard work put in by all those who helped identify the final resting place of our great grandfather William Kington.

"It is wonderful to discover the effort that goes in to preserving the memory of those who fought and died for their country."

The family of Capt Kington and soldiers of The Royal Welsh participate in the rededication service
The family of Capt Kington participated in the rededication service (Picture: Crown Copyright).

At a different spot along the Western Front, an unknown soldier was also buried.

The remains of a soldier from the South Wales Borderers was discovered during drainage work on the outskirts of Richebourg, near Neuve Chapelle. 

The artefacts found with his remains meant he was able to be identified as a South Wales Borderer.

Through extensive research, it is believed that the soldier was most likely a member of the 1st Battalion, who was killed on 9 or 10 May 1915 during Battle of Aubers Ridge.

However due to the high number of men missing from that period of time the JCCC were unable to identity exactly whose the body was.

But, members of the 1st Batallion The Royal Welsh attended the burial where the soldier was laid to rest.