News

Harlequins Receive Visit From Apache Helicopters

Rugby Union side Harlequins have bolstered the ties with the military thanks to a visit from two Apache helicopters.

Harlequins players being shown around the Apache.

Rugby Union side Harlequins have bolstered the ties with the military thanks to a visit from two Apache helicopters. 

The aircraft from 663 Squadron, 3 Regiment Army Air Corps, arrived at the Quins training ground in Guildford with players watching on. 

After landing, players and coaching staff were given the chance to get a closer look at one of the British military's most important assets. 

Harlequin players with an Apache.
Harlequin players with an Apache.

The visit was organised by Player Development Manager, Major Andy Sanger, who used to serve in the Army.

Sanger, the former head coach of the Army rugby team, said: "It's two things really - forming a partnership between Harlequins and the Army and making, what is already a strong link between the club and the forces, a little bit stronger.

"But also, some leadership opportunities for both organisations  and hopefully we can get something that benefits both the Army and the Harlequins on the rugby field."

The servicemen gave a talk to the squad, sharing how they cope with pressure and how they work with the Apache.

Apache helicopter flying into the training ground.
Apache helicopter flying into the training ground.

One of the Apache pilots was Captain Jamie Miller, who had his professional rugby career cut short by injury.

Captain Miller, who played under Major Sanger in last year's Army vs Navy match, said there is some likeness between the two jobs.

"There's a huge amount of similarities between what we do and what they (rugby players) do," Captain Miller explained.

"Part of what we're doing here is to open up and make aware of some of the opportunities that exist within the Army, particularly the Army Air Corps.

"But equally highlight some of the stresses and pressures that we face, how we deal with those and hopefully we can share some of their experience about how they equally deal with some of the stresses and pressures they face," he added. 

The Harlequins players presented the servicemen with team shirts before they took off and headed back to base.