Veterans

Five British Veterans Receive France's Highest Medal Of Honour

Four men and one woman have received the Legion of Honour for their role in liberating the country during the Second World War.

Five British veterans have received France's highest military honour for their role in liberating the country during the Second World War.

The four men and one woman, all aged in their 90s, include an Enigma codebreaker, a soldier who once captured 12 Germans and a cameraman who filmed the landing at Normandy on D-Day.

Ruth Bourne, 92, Joseph Randall, 95, Albert Avann, 93, Alfred Hicks and Thomas Stonehouse were each presented with their Legion of Honour (Legion d'honneur) medals in a ceremony at the French Ambassador's Residence in London.

Four men and one woman were presented with France's highest military honour
Four men and one woman were presented with France's highest medal of honour.

The French Ambassador to the UK, Jean-Pierre Jouyet, said the ceremony was the most emotional event in the year.

"It is a very great honour for me to recognise and express our country's heartfelt gratitude to each of you, who helped liberate France during the Second World War".

British Second World War veteran Alfred Hicks receives France's Legion d'honneur.
93-year-old Alfred Hicks receives France's Legion d'honneur.

Mr Jouyet presented the veterans with their medals and kissed them on both cheeks before the French and British national anthems were played.

British WW2 veterans receive France's highest military medal
France has decorated more than 5,500 British veterans for their role in liberating the country.

The ceremony follows several others that have taken place across the UK since the 70th anniversary of D-Day in June 2014.

Former French President Francois Hollande at the time pledged to honour all British veterans who had served and France has so far decorated more than 5,500 veterans.