Spear 17 Expedition
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Spear 17 Team Complete Mammoth Antarctic Expedition

A group of five British Army reservists have completed their 1,100-mile coast-to-coast crossing of Antarctica in 66 days.The Spear 17...

Spear 17 Expedition

A group of five British Army reservists have completed their 1,100-mile coast-to-coast crossing of Antarctica in 66 days.

The Spear 17 expedition was in SAS officer Henry Worsley's memory.

He died last year after attempting the same expedition, solo.

Forces TV will be speaking to Henry's widow tomorrow (Tuesday), on the anniversary of his death.

The new expedition was carried out in aid of ABF The Soldier's Charity, with the team hoping to raise £100,000 - if you would like to donate, please click here.

Spear 17 Expedition

It saw one of the team become the youngest person ever to manage the feat.

He and his team-mates have become one of just 11 people to cross the uninhabited landmass, meaning more people have walked on the moon than matched them.

Spear 17 Expedition Ollie Stoten

Ollie Stoten, 26, who qualified as a doctor last year, said:

"Each time we think we're out of the woods, the Great White Queen throws another curve ball at us."

"It was definitely the case today. We kept on coming into these areas of disturbed glacial ice.

"You've got this really close crevassing with rock-hard plated ice in between; sections we're alternating every 30-50cm, making it really difficult to travel on, let alone with the pulks swinging round and bashing your legs and trying to take you out or dropping down these gaps and getting wedged in them as well.

"It makes it really difficult to make any progress. I took a couple of nasty tumbles as well.

"The pulk pulled me off my feet after it got carried away in this crevassing and the rock-hard blue ice is unforgiving to land on and left me limping for a good while after. I took some serious pain relief to start making some half decent speed again."


OIlie and his teammates from SPEAR17 - South Pole Expedition Army Reserves 2017 - reached the South Pole on Christmas Day and the Ross Ice Shelf on January 21.

The team were six before one pulled out mid-way through the expedition, after a number of health concerns made it impossible for Alun George to continue.

Ollie, an ultra-marathon runner, said he was looking forward to being back home with his family after a journey of "incredible highs and punishing lows".

Enduring temperatures of -50C, he had suffered from painful frostbite on his lips, cheeks and nose during the expedition.

Pictures courtesy of SWNS.

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