Families

New Wellbeing Course Aims To Help Military Children

There are more than 75,000 children in UK schools who have parents connected to the Armed Forces.

A military children’s charity has launched a new resource for primary schools to support service children.

The Military Child Wellbeing Course was designed by Little Troopers to help serving personnel's children better understand and cope with the unique challenges a life in the Armed Forces can bring.  

There are seven sessions within the course, including how to cope with separation, deployment, house moves and living abroad, as well as the personal themes of belonging, identity and mindfulness.

Little-Troopers-Primary-School-Course
Military children can experience life very differently from their civilian peers due to frequent house and school moves.

Little Troopers founder Louise Fetigan, who is also an Army veteran and military parent, said: "It's a template for schools to deliver a wellbeing course within their educational settings, specifically created for military children and the challenges they often face."

Izzy, a pupil at Kiwi School in Bulford, has been taking part in the course. She said:

"It's a bit scary when you move because it's a new house, a new place and a new everything."

There are more than 75,000 children in UK schools who have parents connected to the military.

These children can experience life very differently from their civilian peers due to frequent house and school moves, as well as regular separation from their serving parent (or parents) due to deployments, training exercises and other service commitments.

The course has been created by a group of experts, including a cognitive behavioural therapy specialist, creative arts psychotherapist and play therapists, alongside Louise Fetigan.