Navy

Devonport Teaches Students About Naval Engineering

More than 70 students from the west of England have visited Devonport to discover more about Royal Navy engineering.

More than 70 students from the west country have spent a day at Devonport Naval Base learning about science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM).

It comes as the UK nears the end of the Government's 'Year of Engineering Focus' - designed to help fill a predicted shortfall of employable people skilled in the four subjects. 

The 72 students were given a tour of the facilities by 1 Assault Group, Royal Marines at Royal Marines Tamar with youngsters getting the chance to have a closer look at a hovercraft and some of the Commando's raiding crafts.

Students drive 'submarines' in the shape of spheres.
Students drive 'submarines' in the shape of spheres.

The pupils were tasked with driving an electronic sphere, which with a bit of imagination, was transformed into a submarine.

The Navy hopes these experiences will inspire the next generation.

"We're not actually here to recruit, what we're actually here to do is to recruit people into the STEM subjects," Lieutenant Commander Paul Youngman explains.

"We're just showing that the Royal Navy and the Royal Marines have opportunities for studying those subjects which will them to join the Navy."

The programme aims to get pupils more interested in STEM subjects.
The programme aims to get pupils more interested in STEM subjects.

Since the Government established the National STEM programme in 2006, events like the one at Devonport are providing new experiences and inspiration.

"I've learnt all about how submarines work...I didn't think it was that complex," says student India.

"I thought it was more up and down when actually it's all about controlling it, getting it to stop at the right time, I've had a fabulous day!"

 Another pupil, Rhys, said: "I do love science and engineering but I don't think think it would be something I'd follow.

"It's very fun...but I don't know yet."