The Queen and her sister Princess Margaret during World War Two
Princess Elizabeth (right) and Princess Margaret after they broadcast on Children's Hour from Buckingham Palace in October 1940 (Picture: CBW/Alamy Stock Photo).
The Queen

Remembering the Queen's first public address during WW2

The then-Princess Elizabeth delivered a broadcast on Children's Hour in October 1940.

The Queen and her sister Princess Margaret during World War Two
Princess Elizabeth (right) and Princess Margaret after they broadcast on Children's Hour from Buckingham Palace in October 1940 (Picture: CBW/Alamy Stock Photo).

Queen Elizabeth II, Britain's longest-reigning monarch, has died aged 96.

In October 1940, the Queen, then Princess Elizabeth, delivered a broadcast on Children's Hour during the Second World War.

The 14-year-old Royal, joined by her sister Princess Margaret at Windsor Castle, called on evacuated youngsters to have courage, telling them she and Margaret knew what it was like to be separated from those they loved.

The princess sent her best wishes to the children who had been evacuated from Britain to America, Canada and elsewhere.

In the crackling radio message, she said: "Thousands of you in this country have had to leave your homes and be separated from your fathers and mothers.

"My sister Margaret Rose and I feel so much for you as we know from experience what it means to be away from those we love most of all."

Margaret was only 10 at the time and joined in by saying goodbye.

Elizabeth remarked: "My sister is by my side and we are both going to say good night to you. Come on, Margaret."

The Queen during World War Two
Just a few years after her inaugral address, Princess Elizabeth joined the Auxiliary Territorial Service during the war (Picture: PA).

Margaret added: "Good night, children," before Elizabeth said: "Good night, and good luck to you all."

In April 2020, during a televised address to the nation about the coronavirus pandemic, the Queen said it reminded her of the very first broadcast she made.

"We, as children, spoke from here at Windsor to children who had been evacuated from their homes and sent away for their own safety," the Queen said.

"Today, once again, many will feel a painful sense of separation from their loved ones.

"But now, as then, we know, deep down, that it is the right thing to do."

She also told the country in lockdown, separated from their families and friends: "We will meet again."