Coronavirus

COVID: Army Medics Administer Vaccines In Aberdeen

Scotland hopes to have vaccinated all adults in the country by the summer, with Army medics boosting the speed of the rollout.

Army medics are administering coronavirus vaccines in Scotland as the country's immunisation programme ramps up.

More than 200 members of the Armed Forces are supporting the jab rollout in Scotland, with the aim to vaccinate all 4.5 million adults in the country by the summer.

Teams of military medics are working alongside their NHS counterparts across the country, using their expertise to help boost the number of vaccines being given out.

Elaine Slattery from NHS Grampian, which looks after health and social care for Aberdeen residents, told Forces News: "We are all at the mercy of the vaccine available at any given week so sometimes it’s a bit of an unknown.

"When the vaccine is more plentiful, obviously that puts additional pressure on the system and for NHS Grampian to deliver that, so with the additional support from the British Army, that has been fantastic."

Captain James Gibson from 3 Medical Regiment, based in Preston, is working at a mass vaccination centre in Aberdeen.

He told Forces News his team can deliver between 700 and 1,000 vaccines a day.

An Army medic prepares a COVID-19 vaccine in Aberdeen.

"It’s absolutely vital that we’re stepping up the vaccination process at the moment," he said.

Captain Gibson said his team is helping with the aim of returning to "normal" and will continue "getting everyone vaccinated that needs to be vaccinated in the timeframe that we want".

Billy Allan, from Aberdeen, was among those to get vaccinated.

He said he was "delighted" to see the Army helping out.

In January, soldiers from the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards and the Royal Army Medical Corps were drafted in to set up 80 vaccination sites across Scotland.

The Prime Minister visited personnel setting up a vaccination centre in Glasgow last month and spoke to members of the military as he was shown around.

Boris Johnson brushed off criticism that his journey was not essential under the country's coronavirus restrictions.