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WATCH: Chelsea Pensioners On Show At Founder's Day Parade

Founder's Day is the only parade of the year attended by all the veterans who are well enough...

The Chelsea Pensioners have paraded to remember King Charles II, the monarch who founded their hospital back in 1681, watched by 3,000 friends and family members.

Founder's Day is the only parade of the year attended by all the veterans who are well enough. 

This year, the inspecting officer was His Royal Highness Prince Michael of Kent, back for the first time since 2002. 

Those on parade included 54 Second World War veterans, a Victoria Cross recipient and personnel who fought all over the world, including Malaya, Burma and the South Atlantic. 

Also known as Oak Apple Day, the celebration is always held as close as possible to 29th May - the birthday of Charles II and the date of his restoration as King in 1660.

The Oak reference commemorates the escape of Charles II after the Battle of Worcester (1651), when he hid in an oak tree to avoid capture by the Parliamentary forces.

For this reason, all members of the Parade wear sprigs of oak leaves.

Monica Parrott, Former Sergeant of the Women's Royal Army Corps, said:

"It's between tears and joy, because you are proud to be doing it and proud that your family is watching you, but it also makes me a bit emotional."

King Charles II founded the Royal Hospital Chelsea to provide a home for 'the relief of veterans broken by age or war'.

He was inspired by Les Invalides, the French hospital that had been built by Louis XIV in Paris 11 years earlier.

Nowadays the Grade I listed site is still home to 280 Chelsea Pensioners, who are all former soldiers of the British Army.