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Celebrating The Auster - The Observation Plane That Helped Us Win WW2

An event to celebrate the Auster aircraft’s 80th anniversary has taken place at the home of the Army Air Corps and museum of Army Flying in...

An event to celebrate the Auster aircraft’s 80th anniversary has taken place at the home of the Army Air Corps and museum of Army Flying in Middle Wallop, Hampshire.

The historical plane played a major part during World War Two as a military liaison and observation post.

Former pilots of the Auster and those who currently still fly the aircraft came together to celebrate its history.

1,600 of the iconic light aircraft were produced during World War Two and played a very important role as an observation post and military liaison.

Its production ceased in 1961, but to this day it remains a popular aircraft; 130 are still airworthy in the United Kingdom.

It remains one of only six fixed-wing aircraft types to have served with the Army Air Corps in its 60-year history.

Auster Aircraft

Arthur Hickman, the son of historical aircraft pilot Julian Hickman, was excited to see the historic plane in action:  

“It was one of the most persistently used observation planes of WW2 - it’s quite amazing really!”.

With its strong affiliation with both the RAF and Army the RAF Baton, which has been travelling around the country to celebrate the Royal Air Force 100th birthday, was passed over at the event and even got a flight in the cockpit of the iconic aircraft.

For Lieutenant Adam Roberts, who received his wings from Prince Harry only a couple of weeks ago, being able to co-pilot the flight was a great honour:

“It’s a privilege to be in the aircraft, and fly around- hopefully keeping the Auster flying for as long as it needs to”.

As the Auster continues to fly across the skies, memories of all that flew the aircraft during the war will live on forever.

Auster Aircraft