Remembrance

Bomber Command Remembrance service takes place

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, joined veterans and serving personnel for the memorial service.

Tributes have been paid in London to members of Bomber Command – honouring the 55,573 men who were killed in action during the Second World War.  

The Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Mike Wigston, joined veterans and serving personnel for a memorial service at Green Park in London.  

This annual service, organised by the Royal Air Force Benevolent Fund, normally takes place in July, but it was postponed this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. Three hundred people also joined in watching online from around the world. 

Squadron Leader, Reverend Chrissie Lacey, Station Chaplain at RAF High Wycombe, led the service, saying: "We remember before God all who served in Bomber Command on the ground and in the air, and all those affected, especially all those who died during the bombing campaign to cripple the intentions of those who intended to harm.

"We remember those who have served in the bomber roles subsequently in theatres of war both far and wide and who did not return. 

"We remember those whom we knew and whose memory we treasure."

Bomber Command was tasked with taking the fight to the Nazis, targeting Germany's economy – its industry, communications and fuel hubs to help win the war.

Being part of a Bomber command squadron was one of the most dangerous roles in the Armed Forces. 55,573 crew lost their lives – 18,000 were wounded or taken prisoner. 

The memorial was officially unveiled by the Queen on 28 June 2012 to honour all the Bomber Command crew who lost their lives during the Second World War.

Its design incorporates sections of aluminium recovered from a Handley Page Halifax III bomber (LW682 from 426 squadron) shot down over Belgium in 1944 in which eight crew were killed.

The memorial is managed and maintained by the RAF Benevolent Fund so that the sacrifice of those who lost their lives will always be remembered.