Reserves

Army Reservist Training Pilot Begins Wider Rollout

The new programme began after the coronavirus pandemic forced reserves to receive large parts of their training online.

A new training pilot is being more widely implemented among British Army reservists undergoing basic training.

The new programme began after the coronavirus pandemic forced reserves to receive large parts of their training online, and combines virtual and field-based exercises.

The course could eventually replace the existing Alpha and Bravo packages which currently form Phase One training.

As part of the newer training, reservists can take advantage of the time between the two packages and use in-field training to discover areas in the programme they may have misunderstood while learning from home.

Alongside the distanced learning, the new programme presents reactive events during the physical element of the course.

Training sees recruits face more realistic on-the-ground challenges, alongside traditional fire-and-move drills.

Under the pilot, part-time soldiers have responded to an unforeseen, simulated roadside accident and demonstrated the ability to handle an escaped, armed prisoner of war.

What are the Alpha and Bravo packages?

The first stage of Phase One training, Alpha, is "designed to lay the foundations of military character for recruits", according to the British Army, and takes place during four training weekends over eight weeks.

Recruits can also complete it over seven days if their personal circumstances allow it.

The next part, Bravo, usually takes place for recruits within eight weeks of Alpha being finished.

Bravo is a 15.5-day course and features further training on topics covered during Alpha, plus new subjects, as well as deployments on two field training exercises.

Cover image: MOD