A new edition of Army At The Fringe event has been launched in Edinburgh after a successful debut last year. 

A number of shows, including 'In-Valid', 'Forget Me Nots', and 'The Troth' are taking place at the Hepburn House Drill Hall Army Reserve Centre during the city’s festival seasons.

The performances will explore Army life past and present, examining its role in the modern world.

Brigadier Robin Lindsay, Commander, 51st Infantry Brigade & HQ Scotland said the aim of the event was to 'enter a dialogue' about the Army:

"Our aim of staging an event like this is to enable us to have a broader dialogue with the audience about who the Army are, what we do, the societies we come from, the societies we live in and the societies we work with.

"So we're keen to enter a dialogue and that's what this is all about."    

Army at the Fringe 2018
Soldiers wives are taking to the stage in the play 'In-Valid Voices' (Picture: Rokkur Friggjar).

Based on real-life interviews, it gives an honest account of Army life from their perspective, exploring some of the challenges faced by soldiers and families from Commonwealth countries.

Bernie Baselala, one of the actors for 'In-Valid Voices', talked about the important themes that the play raises:

"There's a lot of behind-the-scenes things that go on, and the difficult situations they find themselves in, so I think this play is brilliant because it highlights all these issues in it."

Another of the actors, Helen-Marie O’Malley, said: "Obviously the ILR [Indefinite leave to remain] and the visas is hugely important, but also the fragile mental health and the state of the women which is universal for a partner who is remaining at home and their partner is deployed."    

Army at the Fringe 2018
'Forget Me Nots' is a co-production between British and Icelandic artists.

The performance focuses on a love story between a British soldier and an Icelandic man, and the difficulties their relationship brings.

Army at the Fringe 2018
'The Troth' centres on the story of an Indian soldier set against the backdrop of the First World War.

Blending dance, music and archive footage, it follows him from Punjab to the Belgian trenches.

Mira Kaushik gave us a general impression of 'The Troth':

"It's a story about soldiers, so it's relevant any time. It's a human story, it's a very accessible story. So, it's all about emotions of the boys who leave home, who go to all sorts of conditions which they are not familiar to."     

The year’s programme features stories of soldiering from around the world.

It all begins on Friday, with shows on until the 25 August.

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