Big Ben Elizabeth Tower clock showing 11am at Westminster on Armistice Day 2019 with Union flag in foreground
Remembrance

Armistice Day 2019: UK Honours Fallen With Two-Minute Silence

A two-minute silence took place across the country at 11am - 100 years after the first silence was observed on Armistice Day in 1919.

Big Ben Elizabeth Tower clock showing 11am at Westminster on Armistice Day 2019 with Union flag in foreground

It is 100 years since the first two-minute silence was held on Armistice Day in 1919 (Picture: PA).

The UK has been honouring those who have died fighting for their country in conflict.

A two-minute silence took place across the country and overseas at 11am - 100 years after the first silence was observed on Armistice Day, November 11 1919.

A number of political figures were involved in commemorations.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson laid a wreath and spoke to a veteran during a service at the cenotaph in St Peter's Square, Wolverhampton.

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn and Shadow Foreign Secretary Emily Thornberry attended a service outside Islington Town Hall, north London.

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage was among those who marked the occasion at Hartlepool War Memorial.

Other commemorations included a ceremony at the Cenotaph at Belfast City Hall in Northern Ireland and respects being paid at Redford Barracks in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Outside the UK, military personnel attended a Remembrance event in Bahrain, at the British Embassy in Manama.

For this year, the Royal British Legion asked that people paused by muting their telephones, closing laptops, switching off television sets "for just two minutes and pay your respects to our Armed Forces community, past and present".

Armistice Day 2019 follows Remembrance events at the weekend, which included hundreds of serving military personnel and veterans took part in a National Service of Remembrance at the Cenotaph in central London.