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Are Children Interested In World War One History?

Two thirds of British adults say young people do not understand the importance of the First World War.

Two thirds of British adults say young people do not understand the importance of the First World War, according to a recent poll.

However, they may know more than those surveyed think.

Over 700,000 British troops were killed during the war, and 17 million soldiers and civilians in total.

The survey also quizzed participants on school trips, with nine out of 10 believing educational visits can help bring classroom learning to life.

"I started learning in primary school, and have continued in secondary school. I think it's very interesting and important," said Mimi, a pupil at London School for Girls, during a class trip to the National Army Museum.

Classmate Astrid said:

"For us it seems so far away because we are so young, but I feel learning about it... I personally feel like I do understand how important it was."

66% of more than 2,000 British adults asked say children do not understand World War One's significance.

World War One teaching
66% of more than 2,000 British adults asked say children do not understand World War One's significance.

Five years ago Britain's last surviving First World War veteran, Florence Green, died at the age of 110.

Without surviving veterans to pass on their memories the research by the University College London Institute of Education suggests that young people's understanding of World War One may be declining generation by generation.

"The poll would suggest there this decline in understanding, and therefore this fear that the First World War is being forgotten, despite the efforts of the centenary," said Simon Bendry of University College London.

"In fact, our own research and experiences suggest the opposite is true.

"Young people do find it fascinating and are very interested in it."

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