Aircraft

Apache Pilots Practise Low-Level Flying Skills In Scottish Highlands

The Apache is able to work at low altitude and is designed to hunt and destroy tanks, as well as support ground troops. 

Apache pilots from 3 Regiment Army Air Corps' 622 Squadron have travelled to the Scottish Highlands to practise their low-level flying skills.

The Apache AH1 Attack Helicopter is one of the most advanced bits of kit in the British Army - carrying a mix of weapons, including rockets, Hellfire missiles and a 30mm chain gun – all controlled by two pilots in the cockpit.

The pilots are flying sorties across the mountain ranges in the north as part of the training.

Captain Rich Martin told Forces News: "Flying the Apache, there are so many systems on board to aid the flying that actually the flying becomes secondary almost to weaponeering and the more important role of ground support.

"But obviously it is challenging and gets more challenging with weather – the environment we’re in.

"The flying can be very challenging but the airframe is designed as such it makes it one of the easier aircraft to fly."

The Apache AH1 Attack Helicopter is one of the British Army's most advanced pieces of equipment.

The Apache is able to work at low altitude and is designed to hunt and destroy tanks, as well as support ground troops. 

Captain Martin added: "The job doesn’t really compare to any other jobs. It’s pretty amazing, it’s taken a long time to train, to kind of learn the system, learn how it all works.

"It kind of encompasses all the joys of being in the military, also learning a lot about the kit, and the expertise, the engineering."

Ground crew and support staff have also travelled to Leuchars Station for the training, making sure everything is in working order before the pilots take off. 

Air Trooper Frankie Lawson, a ground crew specialist, told Forces News: "It’s extremely important we all work as one big team.

"If one person’s not there then it doesn’t work out, so we all take our roles very seriously and we all come together and help each other out."