Alfie-Allen-Connor-Swindells-and-Jack-O'Connell-in-SAS-Rogue-Heroes-CREDIT-BBC
Alfie Allen, Connor Swindells and Jack O’Connell in SAS Rogue Heroes (Picture: BBC)
History

SAS Rogue Heroes to return to BBC for second series

Alfie-Allen-Connor-Swindells-and-Jack-O'Connell-in-SAS-Rogue-Heroes-CREDIT-BBC
Alfie Allen, Connor Swindells and Jack O’Connell in SAS Rogue Heroes (Picture: BBC)

The BBC has confirmed that Steven Knight's critically acclaimed series, SAS Rogue Heroes, will return for a second series.

Based on Ben Macintyre's best-selling book of the same name, the six-part series brought to life the origins of the elite British Army Special Air Service (SAS) during the Second World War.

Its future was confirmed at the end of the final episode, with a "to be continued" caption as the screen froze on Paddy Mayne (Jack O'Connell) – now in charge of the Rogue Heroes.

The second series will show viewers what comes next for the SAS, following the dramatic turn of events at the end of series one.

Watch: How accurate is the BBC's SAS Rogue Heroes?

Mr Knight, SAS Rogue Heroes' creator, writer, and executive producer, said: "After the roaring success of Rogue Heroes I'm delighted to be embarking on the next chapter of the story.

"Series two will take the SAS into mainland Europe and will take our heroes to the limits of their endurance."

Mr Knight extensively researched the drama series and was keen that serving and former members of the regiment approved of the final production. 

Although based on true events, some elements were exaggerated and, in some instances, toned down so as not to seem too unrealistic to audiences. 

Speaking after a screening of the first episode in London, the example he gave was focused on a scene where David Stirling (played by Connor Swindells) throws an artificial grenade onto a snooker table in a bar to clear the room so he and his colleague could use it – in reality, the hand grenade Stirling threw was real. 

Mr Knight said: "It's never been written down, it came as a consequence [of meeting] Mike Sadler who is the last surviving member of the original SAS. He's now 102, he was 99 when I met him. 

"And he told me the story that he and Stirling were in a bar in Paris and somebody said, 'you can't use this table we're using it all night', and the hand grenade they threw was a real hand grenade. 

"To make it seem realistic I turned it into a dummy hand grenade. 

"They literally had to leave and run because they were beyond reason," he added.