Theresa May
The Prime Minister's decision to call for a snap election has backfired after the vote resulted in a hung Parliament and the Conservative party losing their majority.
 
As the country wonders who will lead the next Government, we have taken a look at how the Prime Minister has voted on defence issues in the past. 
 
Overseas Combat
 
Theresa May has almost always voted for use of UK military forces in combat operations overseas.
 
In 2010 she voted to support the continued deployment of UK Armed Forces in Afghanistan. 
 
She voted to support the establishment of a no-fly zone in Libya in 2011.
 
May also voted for UK airstrikes in Iraq to support the country's efforts against Daesh in 2014 and to support strikes against the group in Syria in December 2015. 
 
2003 Invasion Of Iraq
 
Theresa May voted that the government should use all means necessary to ensure the disarmament of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, with the UK joining the US invasion of the country two days later. 
 
However, she almost always voted for an investigation into the Iraq war.
 
Spending
 
In 2015 she voted in favour of proposed spending cuts and changes to the welfare system and in favour of spending on new nuclear weapons. 
 
The same year she also voted in favour of renewing the Trident nuclear deterrent programme, in line with her party's position.
 
Armed Forces Covenant
 
May has almost always voted against strengthening the Military Covenantvoting against it becoming legally binding in 2011.
 
However, in 2010, she voted to express the belief that the military has been underfunded and the government has failed to honour the Covenant. 
 
The MP also voted against requiring public bodies and minsters to consider the effects of people's service in the Armed Forces when setting healthcare, education and housing policy and to consider if special provisions for current, and former, service personnel are justified in 2011.
 
And she voted against calling on the government to strengthen the military covenant and against there being a reassessment of the assumptions on which the Strategic Defence and Security Review was based in 2012.

Comments