Former staff of a military hospital in Germany have returned to their former workplace for the first time in 20 years.

British Military Hospital Rinteln closed in 1997 and is now a care home for people with special needs.

Since that time, the operating theatre and equipment has remained unchanged with lights and signs remaining virtually untouched.

The World's Creepiest Abandoned Military Sites

There are hundreds of abandoned military bases across the world, serving as eerie reminders of conflicts past.

These abandoned towns, training grounds, runways and missile silos, used by the military for only a few years, will remain as the physical traces of war for years to come.

We took a look of some of the best examples of these ‘military ghost towns’:

Fort Ord, California

Now a national monument, California’s Fort Ord was first used as a field artillery target range in 1917.

Horse cavalry units also trained at the camp until the military began to mechanize and introduce armoured personnel carriers and movable artillery.

Ford Ord was eventually closed in 1991 but remains as one of the best-known abandoned military bases in the world.

Fort Ord
Fort Ord
Fort Ord
Fort Ord

Beelitz Heilstatten Military hospital, Berlin

Berlin is a city famous for its abandoned buildings, but undoubtedly the creepiest of these wartime remnants is the Beelitz Heilstatten Military hospital.

Taken over by the red cross at the start of the First World War, it was here that Hitler was treated for the injuries he sustained in WW1 after he was hit by a grenade.

The shell of the hospital now stands empty, a haunting reminder of Berlin’s bloody past

Beelitz Heilstatten Military hospital
Beelitz Heilstatten Military hospital
Beelitz Heilstatten Military hospital
Beelitz Heilstatten Military hospital

Imber, Wiltshire

Imber, Wiltshire, was abandoned when its residents were evacuated in December 1943 during Second World War and never allowed to return.

The village has now been deserted for over 70 years, after being taken over during the Second World War to allow American soldiers to prepare for the D-Day landings.

Villagers nobly abandoned their homes in order to play their part in the war effort after being told, in 1943, that they had just 47 days to evacuate the village.  

Now, the buildings remain, staircases and fireplaces showing what the eerie buildings once were: ordinary family homes. 

Imber
Imber
Imber
Imber

Teufelsberg Listening Station, Berlin

Built by the American National Security Agency in the 1960s, the listening towers on Teufelsberg in former West Berlin were used to spy on Soviet and East German military communications.

Now the golf ball-like radar domes are a popular visitor destination, where tourists can learn about the city’s cold war history.

Teufelsberg Listening Station
Teufelsberg Listening Station
Teufelsberg Listening Station
Teufelsberg Listening Station

Maunsell Sea Forts, Thames and Mersey Estuaries

Resembling something out of a Science Fiction film, these bizarre looking structures rising from the water once protected Kent from German attack.

The anti-aircraft tower forts were constructed in 1942 and decommissioned in the 1950s when they were famously occupied as pirate radio stations.

Whilst under military use, men would enter the forts via the base of the platform, and climb up a rickety ladder to reach the top of the fort.

Although the forts have begun to decay, many remain in good condition, and although it’s illegal to enter them, they can be seen by boat. 

Maunsell Sea Forts
Maunsell Sea Forts
Maunsell Sea Forts
Maunsell Sea Forts

Balaklava Submarine Base

A monument of the Soviet Union, this underground submarine base was operational until 1993.

Said to be virtually indestructible, the base was designed to withstand a direct atomic impact.

During its operational period, almost the entire population of Balaklava town worked in the base and the last submarine didn’t leave its station at Balaklava until 1996.

The base is now open to the public as a museum. 

Balaklava Submarine Base
Balaklava Submarine Base
Balaklava Submarine Base

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